Drug Courts

7. Conclusion

Drug courts are still growing, and much is needed to understand how each of the parts contributes to the overall functioning and outcomes generated. Drug courts continue to demonstrate positive findings. The National Drug Court Survey fills a gap by providing a picture of how drug courts operate. While improvement needs to occur, it appears that the drug court model is viable. The proliferation of the drug court means that the innovation is working well. Although it appears that more work needs to be done to develop the model, particularly in terms of adopting evidence-based treatments, the drug court model is thriving.

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Notes:

  1. See Taxman, Young, Wiersema, Rhodes, and Mitchell (2007) for a complete discussion of NCJTP survey methodology.
  2. Three cases were excluded from this average due to their having an average daily population of over 1,000 participants.

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